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image: Uncommonly Rare

Uncommonly Rare

By | November 1, 2014

How one of the rarest neurodegenerative diseases could lend insight into ubiquitous neuroprotective processes

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image: Walking with Whales

Walking with Whales

By | November 1, 2014

The history of cetaceans can serve as a model for both evolutionary dynamics and interdisciplinary collaboration.

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image: Modeling Ebola in Mice

Modeling Ebola in Mice

By | October 30, 2014

A genetically diverse group of mice represents the complete spectrum of human outcomes from Ebola virus infection.

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image: 45,000 Year-Old Bone Sequenced

45,000 Year-Old Bone Sequenced

By | October 24, 2014

The oldest human genome to have been sequenced came from a leg bone preserved in Siberia.

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image: Next Generation: Freeze-Dried Gene Networks

Next Generation: Freeze-Dried Gene Networks

By | October 23, 2014

Researchers devise a way to preserve bits of paper containing synthetic gene networks, which can be easily stored and widely distributed. Rehydrated, transcription and translation “come to life.”

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image: Rapid Evolution in Real Time

Rapid Evolution in Real Time

By | October 23, 2014

On islands off the coast of Florida, scientists uncover swift adaptive changes among Carolina anole populations, whose habitats were disturbed by the introduction of another lizard species.

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image: Ancient Europeans Were Lactose Intolerant

Ancient Europeans Were Lactose Intolerant

By | October 21, 2014

Five-thousand years after agricultural practices spread across Neolithic Europe, human populations remained unable to digest sugars from the milk of mammals.

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image: Ancient Sex

Ancient Sex

By | October 19, 2014

Fossils of an extinct, armored fish challenge current understanding of when copulation and internal fertilization evolved in jawed vertebrates.

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image: NYC’s Pathogen-Riddled Rats

NYC’s Pathogen-Riddled Rats

By | October 15, 2014

Researchers find more than a dozen brand new viruses lurking in rodents inhabiting the Big Apple.

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image: New Genes = New Archaea?

New Genes = New Archaea?

By | October 15, 2014

Genes acquired from bacteria contributed to the origins of archaeal lineages, a large-scale phylogenetic analysis suggests.

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