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image: A Scrambled Mess

A Scrambled Mess

By | May 1, 2016

Why do so many human eggs have the wrong number of chromosomes?

2 Comments

image: Obesogens

Obesogens

By | November 1, 2015

Low doses of environmental chemicals can make animals gain weight. Whether they do the same to humans is a thorny issue.

3 Comments

image: Fat Factors

Fat Factors

By | November 1, 2015

A mouse's exposure to certain environmental chemicals can lead the animal—and its offspring and grandoffspring—to be overweight.

1 Comment

image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

7 Comments

image: Focus on Sex

Focus on Sex

By | December 29, 2014

In 2014, new research findings and guidelines brought increased attention to biological differences between males and females.

0 Comments

image: A Tale of Two Genitals

A Tale of Two Genitals

By | November 5, 2014

The genitalia of mammals and reptiles develop from two different tissues, but the structures share common genetic programs and molecular induction signals.

0 Comments

image: Semen Says

Semen Says

By | July 1, 2014

Scientists report for the first time that a snail’s seminal fluid proteins can suppress the mating success of the male side of its hermaphroditic partner.

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image: Week in Review: January 27–31

Week in Review: January 27–31

By | January 31, 2014

Stimulus-triggered pluripotency; antioxidants speed lung tumor growth; the importance of seminal vesicles; how a plant pathogen jumps hosts

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image: More than Sperm Support

More than Sperm Support

By | January 27, 2014

Male mice lacking seminal vesicles father fewer offspring, and their sons suffer from abnormal metabolism into adulthood.

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image: Week in Review: November 18–22

Week in Review: November 18–22

By | November 22, 2013

Chilly mice develop more tumors; gut bacteria aid cancer treatment; two Y chromosome genes sufficient for assisted reproduction; HIV’s “invisibility cloak”

0 Comments

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