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» genetic privacy and immunology

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image: Proceed with Caution

Proceed with Caution

By | October 1, 2013

While genomic data sharing is essential for research, scientists must work to keep sensitive, potentially damaging information under wraps.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review, July 8–12

Week in Review, July 8–12

By | July 12, 2013

Editor accused of fraud leaves post; the good and the bad of gut microbiota; bacterial gene shuffle; legal restrictions hamper illicit drug research; antibodies and autism

0 Comments

image: Debating Bioethics Openly

Debating Bioethics Openly

By | July 1, 2013

Researchers and bioethicists need to take advantage of events such as the recent publication of the HeLa genome to engage the public on topics of privacy, biobank regulation, and more.

3 Comments

image: Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

By | July 1, 2013

Paul Ehrlich came up with an explanation for cellular interactions based on receptors, earning a Nobel Prize and the title "Father of Modern Immunology"—only to have his theory forgotten.

3 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | July 1, 2013

July 2013's selection of notable quotes

3 Comments

image: Nordic Gene Study Requires Consent

Nordic Gene Study Requires Consent

By | June 24, 2013

A company has been ordered to stop estimating Icelanders’ genotypes and linking them to hospital records.

0 Comments

image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity

0 Comments

image: Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

By | June 16, 2013

The cell fragments play a role in the body’s first line of defense against bacterial infection, helping white blood cells grab blood-borne bacteria in the liver.

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Malaria parasites transmitted via mosquitoes elicit a more effective immune response and cause less severe infection than those directly injected into red blood cells.

0 Comments

image: Macrophages Drive Regeneration

Macrophages Drive Regeneration

By | May 22, 2013

The activity of one type of immune cell helps regrow the limbs of amputated salamanders.

3 Comments

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