The Scientist

» genetic privacy and developmental biology

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image: Pluripotent Until Needed

Pluripotent Until Needed

By | April 1, 2013

Microarrays help keep induced pluripotent stem cell lines in check, from start to finish.


image: Smurf-y Old Age

Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.


image: Privacy and the HeLa Genome

Privacy and the HeLa Genome

By | March 26, 2013

European scientists have taken down the HeLa genome after publishing it without the consent of Henrietta Lacks’s family.


image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.


image: Contributors


By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.


image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.


image: Bad Blood

Bad Blood

By | February 20, 2013

US scientists struggle to complete studies in Ecuador in the wake of biopiracy accusations.


image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.


image: Some Insurers Protected by GINA

Some Insurers Protected by GINA

By | January 23, 2013

Long-term, life, and disability insurers may still be able to deny coverage to patients with a genetic disease, under current nondiscrimination legislation.


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