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image: “Anonymous” Genomes Identified

“Anonymous” Genomes Identified

By | May 3, 2013

The names and addresses of people participating in the Personal Genome Project can be easily tracked down despite such data being left off their online profiles.

2 Comments

image: Privacy and the HeLa Genome

Privacy and the HeLa Genome

By | March 26, 2013

European scientists have taken down the HeLa genome after publishing it without the consent of Henrietta Lacks’s family.

6 Comments

image: Bad Blood

Bad Blood

By | February 20, 2013

US scientists struggle to complete studies in Ecuador in the wake of biopiracy accusations.

2 Comments

image: Some Insurers Protected by GINA

Some Insurers Protected by GINA

By | January 23, 2013

Long-term, life, and disability insurers may still be able to deny coverage to patients with a genetic disease, under current nondiscrimination legislation.

2 Comments

image: Preventing Genetic Identity Theft

Preventing Genetic Identity Theft

By | October 11, 2012

A new report lays out the pitfalls of consumer genetics and suggested strategies for safeguarding DNA’s privacy.  

0 Comments

image: New Genome Resource

New Genome Resource

By | July 11, 2012

Members of the Personal Genome Project have created software aimed at helping researchers tease apart genetic differences between individuals.

0 Comments

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