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image: Meeting of the Minds

Meeting of the Minds

By | July 1, 2012

New changes at The Scientist will ensure that we continue to showcase the best and brightest ideas in the life sciences.

1 Comment

image: All’s Not Fair in Science and Publishing

All’s Not Fair in Science and Publishing

By | July 1, 2012

False credit for scientific discoveries threatens the success and pace of research.

70 Comments

image: Daniel Durocher: Change is Good

Daniel Durocher: Change is Good

By | July 1, 2012

Senior Investigator, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Age 40

0 Comments

image: Killer Silk

Killer Silk

By | July 1, 2012

Silk impregnated with bleach may provide a new way to fight the formidable spores of the anthrax bacterium.

4 Comments

image: Flower Barcodes

Flower Barcodes

By | June 28, 2012

Wales creates a database of DNA barcodes for all of its native flowering plants, hoping to guide conservation and drug development efforts.

1 Comment

image: NIH Tackles Racism

NIH Tackles Racism

By | June 25, 2012

An advisory committee urges the federal funding agency to take steps to counter racial bias in the granting process.

2 Comments

image: Nanoparticles Prevent Disease

Nanoparticles Prevent Disease

By | June 22, 2012

Medical devices coated with selenium nanoparticles reduce the growth of a deadly hospital-borne infection.

1 Comment

image: Roundup from Microbiology Meeting

Roundup from Microbiology Meeting

By | June 21, 2012

Some of the interesting stories researchers were discussing at this year’s American Society of Microbiology meeting in San Francisco.

0 Comments

image: UK Gov’t Supports Open Access Plan

UK Gov’t Supports Open Access Plan

By | June 19, 2012

The UK government releases its recommendation that open access be “the main vehicle for the publication of research,” though it warns of the costs that could entail.

0 Comments

image: The Ecology of Fear

The Ecology of Fear

By | June 15, 2012

Grasshoppers in fear of predation die with less nitrogen in their bodies than unstressed grasshoppers, which can affect soil ecology.

2 Comments

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