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image: Future Homes May Have Bioreactive Walls

Future Homes May Have Bioreactive Walls

By | May 1, 2017

Researchers are redesigning the humble brick to produce electricity, to clean water and air, and to harvest valuable compounds.

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Scientists discover transcripts from the same gene that can express both proteins and noncoding RNA.  

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The giant lizards have numerous microbicidal compounds in their blood.

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Studies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus’s long-term hiding places in the body.

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A mouse study reveals a causal link between changes in intestinal microbiota and increasing inflammation as the rodents age.

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Mice exposed to low doses of penicillin in utero or as young pups exhibited long-term behavioral differences not seen in their non-exposed counterparts, according to a study.

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Recolonizing middle-aged animals with bacteria from younger ones kept killifish alive longer than usual, researchers report.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Hitting It Out of the Park

Hitting It Out of the Park

By | April 1, 2017

Cancer can be as evasive and slippery as a spitball, but new immunotherapies are starting to connect.

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image: Location, Location, Location

Location, Location, Location

By | April 1, 2017

Since first proposing that a cell’s function and biology depend on its surroundings, Mina Bissell continues to probe the role of the extracellular matrix.

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