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image: T cells and Transplantation

T cells and Transplantation

By | November 13, 2013

Drug-resistant immune cells protect patients from graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplant.

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image: Time for T cells

Time for T cells

By | November 7, 2013

Circadian rhythms control the development of inflammatory T cells, while jet lag sends their production into overdrive.

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image: Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

By | November 6, 2013

Cells that temporarily restrain their immune systems give babies’ gut bacteria a chance to settle down. 

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image: Frisky Fruit Flies

Frisky Fruit Flies

By | November 5, 2013

Researchers show that Drosophila females upregulate an immune gene for protection against sexually transmitted infections before copulation.

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: It’s in the Genes

It’s in the Genes

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers find strong correlations between the composition of the human microbiome and genetic variation in immune-related pathways.

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image: Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

By | October 20, 2013

An immune suppressive drug can unexpectedly help immunized mice fight off many strains of flu.

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image: Secret Botulism Paper Published

Secret Botulism Paper Published

By | October 18, 2013

The discovery of a new form of the deadly botulinum toxin gets published, but its sequence is kept under wraps until an antidote is developed.

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image: Jurassic Bummer

Jurassic Bummer

By | September 12, 2013

Researchers find that extracting dinosaur DNA from insects embedded in ancient amber is likely impossible.

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