The Scientist

» DNA, immunology and developmental biology

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image: Mimicking Mussels

Mimicking Mussels

By | April 1, 2013

Scientists develop a gel that mimics mollusc glue to coat the insides of blood vessels.

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image: Pluripotent Until Needed

Pluripotent Until Needed

By | April 1, 2013

Microarrays help keep induced pluripotent stem cell lines in check, from start to finish.

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Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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Speaking of Science

By | April 1, 2013

April 2013's selection of notable quotes

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DNA Is a Flame Retardant

By | March 13, 2013

Cotton cloth coated with DNA from herring sperm does not burn.

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All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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image: Antibody-Dependent Enhanced (ADE) Immunity

Antibody-Dependent Enhanced (ADE) Immunity

By | March 2, 2013

The method to the dengue virus's maddening infectiousness.

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Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Bedeviled by Dengue

Bedeviled by Dengue

By | March 1, 2013

The global spread of dengue virus has immunologists and public-health experts debating the best way to curb infection.

5 Comments

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Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

2 Comments

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