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image: Unraveling H7N9’s History

Unraveling H7N9’s History

By | December 30, 2014

An analysis of stored samples shows that H7N9 precursor H9N2, a virus widespread in chickens, has shown increased fitness in recent years.

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image: The Year in Pathogens

The Year in Pathogens

By | December 29, 2014

Ebola, MERS, and enterovirus D68; polio eradication efforts; new regulations on potentially dangerous research

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image: Repurposed Retroviruses

Repurposed Retroviruses

By | December 18, 2014

B cells have commandeered ancient viral sequences in the genome to transmit antigen signals.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | December 18, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Iron-Ferrying Protein Impedes Pathogens

Iron-Ferrying Protein Impedes Pathogens

By | December 15, 2014

Meningitis-causing bacteria exerted strong evolutionary pressure on an iron-binding protein in primates, a study shows.

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image: Bird Genomes Abound

Bird Genomes Abound

By | December 11, 2014

Scientists complete the largest-ever comparative genomic study of birds.

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image: DNA Loop-the-Loops

DNA Loop-the-Loops

By | December 11, 2014

A new full-genome map indicates how DNA is folded within the nuclei of human cells.

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image: Winning Bidder to Return Watson’s Nobel

Winning Bidder to Return Watson’s Nobel

By | December 9, 2014

Russian entrepreneur Alisher Usmanov, who purchased James Watson’s 1962 Nobel Prize medal last week, is returning it to the molecular biologist.

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image: Evolution in Oil Droplets

Evolution in Oil Droplets

By | December 9, 2014

For the first time, researchers have mimicked biological evolution using chemicals instead of living organisms.

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image: Watson Sells Nobel for $4.1M

Watson Sells Nobel for $4.1M

By | December 8, 2014

James Watson, who helped to discover the structure of DNA, has auctioned off his Nobel Prize medal.

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