The Scientist

» DNA, immunology and evolution

Most Recent

image: Rhinoviruses Exposed

Rhinoviruses Exposed

By | February 1, 2013

Some of these insidious viruses expertly subvert the host immune system, allowing their unhindered proliferation.

0 Comments

image: The Spoils of War

The Spoils of War

By | February 1, 2013

Researchers read the marks of intense warfare and conquest in the genes of ancient native North Americans.

4 Comments

image: Catching the Cold

Catching the Cold

By | February 1, 2013

Tracking the genetic diversity and evolution of rhinoviruses can lead to a better understanding of viral evolution, the common cold, and more dangerous infections.

2 Comments

image: Color from Structure

Color from Structure

By | February 1, 2013

Researchers are working to understand how often-colorless biological nanostructures give rise to some of the most spectacular technicolor displays in nature.

4 Comments

image: Icing Organs

Icing Organs

By | February 1, 2013

Why scientists are so near and yet so far from being able to cryopreserve organs

6 Comments

image: DNA-based Data Storage Here to Stay

DNA-based Data Storage Here to Stay

By | January 23, 2013

The second example of storing digital data in DNA affirms its potential as a long-term storage medium.

4 Comments

image: Dogs Adapted to Agriculture

Dogs Adapted to Agriculture

By | January 23, 2013

As wolves became domesticated, their genes adapted to a starch-rich diet of human leftovers.

5 Comments

image: Double DNA

Double DNA

By | January 22, 2013

Scientists provide evidence for the existence of four-stranded human DNA, which has previously only been theorized and synthesized.

3 Comments

image: Universal Flu Vaccines Charge Ahead

Universal Flu Vaccines Charge Ahead

By | January 14, 2013

Researchers and biotech companies are bringing a universal flu vaccine closer to reality.

0 Comments

image: Predator-Savvy Shark Embryos

Predator-Savvy Shark Embryos

By | January 10, 2013

Bamboo sharks still developing in their egg cases respond to a predator presence by ceasing movement and even breathing.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  2. Sequencing Reveals Genomic Diversity of the Human Brain
  3. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  4. What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs
RayBiotech