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image: Deploying the Body’s Army

Deploying the Body’s Army

By | April 1, 2014

Using patients’ own immune systems to fight cancer

3 Comments

image: DNA Bends Control Gene Activation

DNA Bends Control Gene Activation

By | March 25, 2014

Genomic structures called i-motifs signal DNA activation, while hairpin loops signal gene suppression.  

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image: Vitamin A’s Influence on Immunity

Vitamin A’s Influence on Immunity

By | March 19, 2014

Exposure to vitamin A in the womb influences immune system development and lifelong ability to fight infections, a mouse study shows. 

1 Comment

image: Matthew Powner: Origin Solver

Matthew Powner: Origin Solver

By | March 1, 2014

Lecturer, Department of Chemistry, University College London. Age: 32

2 Comments

image: DNA Damage Scout

DNA Damage Scout

By | February 11, 2014

Researchers are beginning to appreciate a role for RNA polymerase beyond gene transcription.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: February 3–7

Week in Review: February 3–7

By | February 7, 2014

Federal stem cell regulations vary; Salmonella exploit host immune system; microglia help maintain synaptic connections; prosthesis re-creates feeling of touch

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image: Immune Response Promotes Infection

Immune Response Promotes Infection

By | February 6, 2014

Salmonella enterica can exploit a standard immune response in mice to promote its own growth.

2 Comments

image: Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

By | February 2, 2014

Without microglia to pluck off unwanted synapses in early life, mouse brains develop with weaker connections, leading to altered social behavior.

2 Comments

image: Inner Neanderthal

Inner Neanderthal

By | January 30, 2014

Two studies demonstrate the extent of Neanderthal DNA that persists in modern human genomes.

8 Comments

image: Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

By | January 20, 2014

Injection of microscopic particles of a plastic-like material protects mice from cardiac tissue damage following heart attack.

1 Comment

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