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Ancient Appearances

By | May 1, 2013

A new DNA assay developed by forensic scientists helps archaeologists reconstruct eye and hair color from old teeth and bones.

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image: Gregory Sonnenberg: Cellular Spy

Gregory Sonnenberg: Cellular Spy

By | May 1, 2013

Research Associate, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. Age: 27

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IDing War Victims

By | May 1, 2013

Libyan scientists, soon to be trained in countries around the world, are undertaking a massive search mission to find missing loved ones among thousands of dead bodies, casualties of the country’s recent popular revolution.

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Suited to a T

By | May 1, 2013

Sorting out T-cell functional and phenotypic heterogeneity depends on studying single cells.

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image: Viruses on the Brain

Viruses on the Brain

By | May 1, 2013

Viral infections of the central nervous system may trigger cytokines that induce seizures.

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Why So Soon?

By | May 1, 2013

Researchers are using modern experimental tools to probe the mysterious molecular pathways that lead to premature labor and birth.

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Mimicking Mussels

By | April 1, 2013

Scientists develop a gel that mimics mollusc glue to coat the insides of blood vessels.

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Speaking of Science

By | April 1, 2013

April 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: DNA Is a Flame Retardant

DNA Is a Flame Retardant

By | March 13, 2013

Cotton cloth coated with DNA from herring sperm does not burn.

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image: Antibody-Dependent Enhanced (ADE) Immunity

Antibody-Dependent Enhanced (ADE) Immunity

By | March 2, 2013

The method to the dengue virus's maddening infectiousness.

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