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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | June 1, 2016

Beyond Biocentrism, The Sting of the Wild, The Birth of Anthropocene, and Ordinarily Well

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | June 1, 2016

14-day-old embryos, prioritizing biodiversity, and more

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image: Start Making Sense

Start Making Sense

By | June 1, 2016

Scientific progress is only achieved when humans' innate sense of understanding is validated by objective reality.

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image: The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

By | June 1, 2016

In failing hearts, cardiomyocytes change their fuel preference.

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image: In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

By | June 1, 2016

While the heart cells normally burn fatty acids, when things go wrong ketones become the preferred fuel source.

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks. 

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image: Another Andrew Wakefield Movie in the Works

Another Andrew Wakefield Movie in the Works

By | May 4, 2016

This one will be largely based on the discredited anti-vaccine researcher’s 2010 book.

10 Comments

image: Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

By | May 4, 2016

Contrary to the popular thought that many species are “unculturable,” the majority of bacteria known to populate the human gut can be grown in the lab, scientists show.

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image: Observing the Nuclear Pore

Observing the Nuclear Pore

By | May 2, 2016

Scientists visualize nuclear pore complexes for the first time, using high-speed atomic force microscopy.

1 Comment

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