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image: Spotlight on the Cytoskeleton

Spotlight on the Cytoskeleton

By | May 27, 2014

Technique allows researchers to see the inner workings of cellular scaffolding molecules actin and tubulin.

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image: When Stop Means Go

When Stop Means Go

By | May 22, 2014

A survey of trillions of base pairs of microbial DNA reveals a considerable degree of stop codon reassignment.

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image: Border Collies vs. <em>E. coli</em>

Border Collies vs. E. coli

By | May 21, 2014

A study shows that the herding dogs can be an effective means of controlling bacterial infections spread by seagulls.

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image: Birds of a Genome

Birds of a Genome

By | May 21, 2014

Married couples have more similar DNA than random pairs of people, a study shows.

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image: Characterizing the “Healthy” Vagina

Characterizing the “Healthy” Vagina

By | May 19, 2014

The overly simplistic notion of a Lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiome is giving way to an appreciation of diverse and dynamic bacterial communities.

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image: Exercise Can Erase Memories

Exercise Can Erase Memories

By | May 8, 2014

Running causes rodents to forget their fears in part because of increased hippocampal neurogenesis, a study shows.

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image: Exploring the Roles of Enhancer RNAs

Exploring the Roles of Enhancer RNAs

By | May 7, 2014

Scientists have recently discovered that enhancers are often transcribed into RNAs. But they’re still not sure what, if anything, these eRNAs do.

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image: Week in Review: April 28–May 2

Week in Review: April 28–May 2

By | May 2, 2014

Male scientists stress mice out; using SCNT to reprogram adult cells; acetate can reach mouse brain, reduce appetite; WHO sounds “post-antibiotic era” alarm

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image: Hear Ye, Hear Ye

Hear Ye, Hear Ye

By | May 1, 2014

Tools for tracking quorum-sensing signals in bacterial colonies

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image: Sophie Dumont: Forces at Play

Sophie Dumont: Forces at Play

By | May 1, 2014

Assistant Professor, Department of Cell & Tissue Biology, University of California, San Francisco. Age: 38

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