The Scientist

» DNA, developmental biology and ecology

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image: DNA Hard Drive

DNA Hard Drive

By | May 23, 2012

Researchers design the first rewritable biological data storage system.

2 Comments

image: Wet Weather Stymies Insects

Wet Weather Stymies Insects

By | May 21, 2012

The rainiest April in 100 years is keeping many insects from flourishing in the United Kingdom.

1 Comment

image: How Prawns Lure Prey

How Prawns Lure Prey

By | May 15, 2012

Orange-loving Trinidad guppies are curiously attracted to orange spots on prawn pincers, which may make it easier for the predators to snatch them up.

1 Comment

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | May 15, 2012

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

5 Comments

image: Can Fish Eco-Labeling be Trusted?

Can Fish Eco-Labeling be Trusted?

By | May 14, 2012

Programs that provide sustainable certification for fisheries may be too generous with their accreditation.

3 Comments

image: Ocean Plastic Aid Insects

Ocean Plastic Aid Insects

By | May 10, 2012

Floating pools of plastic debris in the Pacific offer more surfaces for marine insects to lay eggs.

3 Comments

image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

6 Comments

image: Six Threats to Chromosomes

Six Threats to Chromosomes

By | May 3, 2012

Researchers identify two new DNA repair systems, in addition to four that were already known, that can attack unprotected telomeres.

5 Comments

image: Stem Cell Suicide Switch

Stem Cell Suicide Switch

By | May 3, 2012

Human embryonic stem cells swiftly kill themselves in response to DNA damage.

10 Comments

image: The Sugar Lnc

The Sugar Lnc

By | May 1, 2012

Genes that react to cellular sugar content are regulated by a long non-coding RNA via an unexpected mechanism

2 Comments

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