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» DNA, developmental biology and evolution

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image: Moss Harbors Foreign Genes

Moss Harbors Foreign Genes

By | October 23, 2012

Genes from fungi, bacteria, and viruses may have helped mosses and other plants to colonize the land.

2 Comments

image: Cloning Biologist Dies

Cloning Biologist Dies

By | October 12, 2012

Keith Campbell, a biologist who was part of the effort to clone Dolly the sheep, has passed away at the age of 58.

1 Comment

image: Preventing Genetic Identity Theft

Preventing Genetic Identity Theft

By | October 11, 2012

A new report lays out the pitfalls of consumer genetics and suggested strategies for safeguarding DNA’s privacy.  

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image: Pioneer DNA Researcher Dies

Pioneer DNA Researcher Dies

By | October 2, 2012

Leonard Lerman, who helped elucidate the process from gene to protein, passed away last month at age 87.

1 Comment

image: The Salinella salve Mystery

The Salinella salve Mystery

By | October 1, 2012

Salinella salve, an organism described as a single layer of cells, ciliated on both inner and outer surfaces and surrounding…

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | October 1, 2012

Regenesis and The Half-Life of Facts

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image: Gone Missing, circa 1892

Gone Missing, circa 1892

By | October 1, 2012

A unique organism sighted only once, more than a century ago, could shed light on the evolution of multicellularity—if it ever actually existed.

3 Comments

image: Home Cookin’

Home Cookin’

By | October 1, 2012

Laboratory-raised populations of dung beetles reveal a mother's extragenetic influence on the physiques of her sons.

2 Comments

image: Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

By | October 1, 2012

Epigenetic changes accrued over an organism’s lifetime may leave a permanent heritable mark on the genome, through the help of long noncoding RNAs.

21 Comments

image: Evolving Dependence

Evolving Dependence

By | September 27, 2012

Scientists unravel the confusing molecular biology behind a fruit fly’s reliance on a single type of cactus.

1 Comment

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