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image: Birds of a Genome

Birds of a Genome

By | May 21, 2014

Married couples have more similar DNA than random pairs of people, a study shows.

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image: Exploring the Roles of Enhancer RNAs

Exploring the Roles of Enhancer RNAs

By | May 7, 2014

Scientists have recently discovered that enhancers are often transcribed into RNAs. But they’re still not sure what, if anything, these eRNAs do.

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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image: Genetic Brain Disorder Explained

Genetic Brain Disorder Explained

By | April 25, 2014

Researchers uncover a mutation responsible for a rare neurological condition.

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image: Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

By | April 14, 2014

Doctors implant custom-made organs, built from a tissue sample and a biodegradable scaffold, into four female patients born with underdeveloped or missing vaginas.

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image: Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

By | April 2, 2014

Researchers complete an atlas depicting gene expression across the developing human brain.

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image: Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

By | March 26, 2014

New research suggests that the wooly beasts may have succumbed to a shrinking gene pool or intense environmental pressures as their species went extinct.

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image: DNA Bends Control Gene Activation

DNA Bends Control Gene Activation

By | March 25, 2014

Genomic structures called i-motifs signal DNA activation, while hairpin loops signal gene suppression.  

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image: <em>BRCA1</em> Linked to Brain Size

BRCA1 Linked to Brain Size

By | March 20, 2014

The breast cancer-associated gene may play a protective role in neural stem cells, a mouse study finds.

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image: A Twist of Fate

A Twist of Fate

By | March 1, 2014

Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.

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