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» DNA, disease/medicine and neuroscience

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image: Opinion: Health Booth 2020

Opinion: Health Booth 2020

By | February 4, 2013

Using a SMART card containing your genetic information and medical history, you could one day soon be diagnosed and treated for all kinds of diseases at an ATM-style kiosk.

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image: A Window into the Mind

A Window into the Mind

By | February 1, 2013

Researchers have generated an image of thoughts flitting through the brains of zebrafish.

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image: Why Mice Like Massages

Why Mice Like Massages

By | February 1, 2013

Researchers pinpoint a gene marker for neurons sensitive to gentle touch such as grooming.

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image: A Chill Issue

A Chill Issue

By | February 1, 2013

The very cold, the merely chilled, and the colorful

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image: Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

By | February 1, 2013

As cholera first tore through the Europe in the mid-19th century, people tried anything to prevent the deadly disease. Then science stepped in.

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image: Flickering Neurons

Flickering Neurons

By | February 1, 2013

Fluorescent calcium sensors in transgenic mice give a real-time readout of neuronal activity.

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image: Immune to Failure

Immune to Failure

By | February 1, 2013

With dogged persistence and an unwillingness to entertain defeat, Bruce Beutler discovered a receptor that powers the innate immune response to infections—and earned his share of a Nobel Prize.

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image: The Spoils of War

The Spoils of War

By | February 1, 2013

Researchers read the marks of intense warfare and conquest in the genes of ancient native North Americans.

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image: Catching the Cold

Catching the Cold

By | February 1, 2013

Tracking the genetic diversity and evolution of rhinoviruses can lead to a better understanding of viral evolution, the common cold, and more dangerous infections.

2 Comments

image: Athletes Are Champion Visual Learners

Athletes Are Champion Visual Learners

By | January 31, 2013

Pro athletes can learn to parse a complicated moving visual scene faster than most.

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