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Cancer Growth Curtailed

By | April 4, 2013

Researchers develop two small molecules that slow the growth of human cancer cells.

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image: Roadmap to an HIV Vaccine

Roadmap to an HIV Vaccine

By | April 3, 2013

Researchers track the evolution of HIV in a single patient to understand what drives the production of broadly neutralizing antibodies.

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Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.

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image: Cancer Clinical Trials of Tomorrow

Cancer Clinical Trials of Tomorrow

By | April 1, 2013

Advances in genomics and cancer biology will alter the design of human cancer studies.

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Contributors

By | April 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Making Cancer More Transparent

Making Cancer More Transparent

By | April 1, 2013

A decade into the age of genomics, science is generating a flood of data that will help in the quest to eradicate the disease.

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image: Pluripotent Until Needed

Pluripotent Until Needed

By | April 1, 2013

Microarrays help keep induced pluripotent stem cell lines in check, from start to finish.

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Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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Speaking of Science

By | April 1, 2013

April 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: Up, Up, and Array

Up, Up, and Array

By | April 1, 2013

By scrutinizing gene expression profiles instead of individual oncogenes, Todd Golub launched a powerful platform for diagnosing, classifying, and treating cancer.

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