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image: Cell Re-Programmers Take the Nobel

Cell Re-Programmers Take the Nobel

By | October 8, 2012

John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka win this year’s Nobel Prize in Medicine for learning how to reboot cellular development. 

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image: Cell Reprogramming Work Wins Nobel

Cell Reprogramming Work Wins Nobel

By | October 8, 2012

John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka jointly take home this year’s Nobel Prize in Medicine for turning back the developmental clock. 

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image: Pioneer DNA Researcher Dies

Pioneer DNA Researcher Dies

By | October 2, 2012

Leonard Lerman, who helped elucidate the process from gene to protein, passed away last month at age 87.

1 Comment

image: Salmonella Strain Spreads Alongside HIV

Salmonella Strain Spreads Alongside HIV

By | October 1, 2012

Researchers find that a deadly bacterial disease hitchhikes in people infected with the virus that causes AIDS to spread throughout sub-Saharan Africa.

2 Comments

image: Novel Deadly Virus

Novel Deadly Virus

By | October 1, 2012

A new rhabdovirus may be responsible for an outbreak of fatal hemorrhagic fever.

4 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | October 1, 2012

Regenesis and The Half-Life of Facts

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image: 2012 Labbies Honorable Mentions

2012 Labbies Honorable Mentions

By | October 1, 2012

Check out other memorable images and videos that were submitted to this year’s Labby Multimedia Awards.

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image: Medicines for the World

Medicines for the World

By | October 1, 2012

A global R&D treaty could boost innovation and improve the health of the world’s poor—and rich.

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image: Cystic Fibrosis Alters Microbiome?

Cystic Fibrosis Alters Microbiome?

By | September 28, 2012

The microbiome of the lung is different in patients with the disease, which causes a thick buildup of mucus that makes breathing difficult.

2 Comments

image: Swapping DNA in the Womb

Swapping DNA in the Womb

By | September 27, 2012

A new study finds male genes in women’s brains, the first evidence of microchimerism in the human brain.

10 Comments

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