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image: Robot Legs Obey Brain

Robot Legs Obey Brain

By | September 7, 2012

A pair of mechanical leg braces that are controlled by their wearer’s brain signals could help paralyzed patients walk again.

1 Comment

image: A Funding Reboot

A Funding Reboot

By | September 5, 2012

Scientists ask the NSF to reconsider a granting mechanism they say could hurt junior faculty.

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image: Getting to Know the Genome

Getting to Know the Genome

By | September 5, 2012

A massive project involving hundreds of scientists suggests that very little—if any—of the human genome is truly non-functional.

10 Comments

image: Dogs Improve Beach Sanitation

Dogs Improve Beach Sanitation

By | September 4, 2012

Canines that chase away seagulls have been helping to reduce the amount of bird droppings, which can carry disease and lead to beach closures.

2 Comments

image: Down and Dirty

Down and Dirty

By | September 1, 2012

Diverse plant communities create a disease-fighting "soil genotype."

3 Comments

image: Good Vibrations

Good Vibrations

By | September 1, 2012

Researchers are learning how species from across the animal kingdom use seismic signals to mate, hunt, solve territorial disputes, and much more.

1 Comment

image: Pleasant to the Touch

Pleasant to the Touch

By | September 1, 2012

Scientists hope an understanding of nerve fibers responsive only to gentle touch will give insight into the role the sense plays in social bonding.

0 Comments

image: From Plants and Fungi to Clouds

From Plants and Fungi to Clouds

By | August 31, 2012

Salt compounds produced by plant and fungus species help form organic aerosols that form clouds and produce rain.

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image: Opinion: Younger Is Better

Opinion: Younger Is Better

By | August 31, 2012

Stem cells collected from younger donors are more effective for transplantation and regenerative medicine than those from older individuals.

9 Comments

image: Stalking Sharks

Stalking Sharks

By | August 30, 2012

Researchers monitor the movement of the Pacific’s largest predators and share the information with the world in real time.

0 Comments

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