The Scientist

» DNA, ecology and evolution

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image: Opinion: Fishy Deaths

Opinion: Fishy Deaths

By | October 29, 2012

Record fish die-offs in the Midwest call for a fresh look at how humans are disrupting the planet’s essential water cycle.

1 Comment

image: Moss Harbors Foreign Genes

Moss Harbors Foreign Genes

By | October 23, 2012

Genes from fungi, bacteria, and viruses may have helped mosses and other plants to colonize the land.

2 Comments

image: Natural-Born Doctors

Natural-Born Doctors

By | October 23, 2012

Bees, sheep, and chimps are just a few of the animals known to self-medicate. Can they teach us about maintaining our own health?

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image: Opinion: Controlling Invasion

Opinion: Controlling Invasion

By | October 15, 2012

Remote sensing helps control an invasive giant weed that threatens ecosystems and border security.

2 Comments

image: Preventing Genetic Identity Theft

Preventing Genetic Identity Theft

By | October 11, 2012

A new report lays out the pitfalls of consumer genetics and suggested strategies for safeguarding DNA’s privacy.  

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | October 9, 2012

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Beard Beer

Beard Beer

By | October 4, 2012

A brewmaster is creating a signature concoction using yeast found in his facial hair.

2 Comments

image: Pioneer DNA Researcher Dies

Pioneer DNA Researcher Dies

By | October 2, 2012

Leonard Lerman, who helped elucidate the process from gene to protein, passed away last month at age 87.

1 Comment

image: The Salinella salve Mystery

The Salinella salve Mystery

By | October 1, 2012

Salinella salve, an organism described as a single layer of cells, ciliated on both inner and outer surfaces and surrounding…

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | October 1, 2012

Regenesis and The Half-Life of Facts

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