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image: More Lab-Made Nucleotides

More Lab-Made Nucleotides

By | June 8, 2015

Artificial bases that act like the real deal can be designed to bind specifically to tumor cells.

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image: Renowned Molecular Biologist Dies

Renowned Molecular Biologist Dies

By | May 6, 2015

Alexander Rich, discoverer of Z-DNA, the RNA-DNA double helix, and the structure of collagen, has passed away at age 90.

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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: Researchers Unearth Cervantes’s Tomb

Researchers Unearth Cervantes’s Tomb

By | March 19, 2015

A convent in Madrid may contain some of the Spanish literary giant’s remains, forensic experts say.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Reading Between the Pages

Reading Between the Pages

By | March 1, 2015

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin and the University of York excavate the genetic secrets contained in the DNA of old parchments.

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image: Slip Me Some Skin

Slip Me Some Skin

By | March 1, 2015

Scientists tracing the history of livestock breeding probe parchment documents for genetic information.

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image: Wrangling Retrotransposons

Wrangling Retrotransposons

By , , and | March 1, 2015

These mobile genetic elements can wreak havoc on the genome. Researchers are now trying to understand how such activity contributes to the aging process.

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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