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image: No Place to Hide

No Place to Hide

By | May 31, 2017

Environmental DNA is tracking down difficult-to-detect species, from rock snot in the U.S. to cave salamanders in Croatia.

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Scientists discover transcripts from the same gene that can express both proteins and noncoding RNA.  

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A conversation with computer scientist Yaniv Erlich

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In 1992, advancements in microscopy zoomed in on the precise architecture of the complex, including unforeseen structural repetition in two halves of the ring.

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image: Evolution May Have Deleted Neanderthal DNA

Evolution May Have Deleted Neanderthal DNA

By | November 9, 2016

Natural selection may be behind the dearth of Neanderthal DNA in modern humans.

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image: Largest Human Genetic Variation Repository Yet

Largest Human Genetic Variation Repository Yet

By | August 17, 2016

An open-access catalog of tens of thousands of human exome sequences highlights the power of a very large genomic dataset in pinpointing genes linked to rare diseases. 

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image: Tumor Traps

Tumor Traps

By | April 1, 2016

After surgery to remove a tumor, neutrophils recruited to the site spit out sticky webs of DNA that aid cancer recurrence.

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image: Human Exomes Galore

Human Exomes Galore

By | November 16, 2015

A new database includes complete sequences of protein-coding DNA from 60,706 individuals.

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image: Epigenetic Mechanism Tunes Brain Cells

Epigenetic Mechanism Tunes Brain Cells

By | July 2, 2015

Regular replacement of histones in human and murine neurons is required for neuronal plasticity, a study shows.

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image: Police Sketches Via DNA

Police Sketches Via DNA

By | July 1, 2015

For assistance in solving crimes, a company has developed a service that will construct a face based on a genetic sample.

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