The Scientist

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image: Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

By | November 30, 2015

A study of black widow spiders suggests that the arachnids leave traces of their own genetic material and DNA from prey in their sticky webs.

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image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.

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image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.

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image: Predatory Journal Biz Booming

Predatory Journal Biz Booming

By | October 5, 2015

Scientific publishers with questionable standards raked in about $75 million and published more than 400,000 articles last year, according to a new analysis.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: “WikiGate” Ruffles OA Feathers

“WikiGate” Ruffles OA Feathers

By | September 16, 2015

A partnership between Wikipedia and scholarly publishing behemoth Elsevier has open-access advocates up in arms.

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image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: 1 + 1 = 1

1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.

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image: Intelligence Gathering

Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

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