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1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.

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Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

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image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

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image: EMBL Goes OA

EMBL Goes OA

By | June 17, 2015

Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory must now publish their work in an open-access database.

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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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Truly Brief Communications

By | February 18, 2015

The Journal of Brief Ideas, a platform that publishes 200-word articles, launches in beta.

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image: University of California Doubles Down on OA

University of California Doubles Down on OA

By | January 21, 2015

The academic institution’s press is launching two new open-access initiatives to make research results and academic manuscripts publicly available.

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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