The Scientist

» open access publishing and evolution

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2013

Leopold, The Drunken Botanist, Beautiful Whale, and Between Man and Beast


image: The Roots of Violence

The Roots of Violence

By | April 1, 2013

Archaeology can shine needed light on the evolution of our aggressive tendencies.


image: Week in Review, March 18-22

Week in Review, March 18-22

By | March 22, 2013

Venom-based drugs for pain; microbes in the deep ocean; altruistic, suicidal bacteria; a call for open access; clinical sequencing; the newest genomes


image: Opinion: Open-Access for the 3rd World

Opinion: Open-Access for the 3rd World

By | March 21, 2013

Scientists should submit their work to open-access repositories to support research in parts of the world that don’t have access to the vast libraries of pay-wall-constrained literature.


image: The Upside of Suicide

The Upside of Suicide

By | March 20, 2013

Researchers show that a bacterium’s self-sacrifice can benefit its community, even when the members are not strongly related.


image: Sequencing the Underdogs

Sequencing the Underdogs

By | March 8, 2013

Transcriptome studies reveal new insights about unusual animals whose genomes have not been sequenced.


image: Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

By | March 7, 2013

A red alga appears to have adapted to extremely hot, acidic environments by collecting genes from bacteria and archaea.


image: Obama Mandates Expanded Access

Obama Mandates Expanded Access

By | February 26, 2013

The President asks large agencies to make all government-funded research publicly available within a year of publication.

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image: Opinion: Cooperating to Study Cooperation

Opinion: Cooperating to Study Cooperation

By | February 20, 2013

Physicists and biologists are working together to understand cooperation at all levels of life, from the cohesion of molecules to interspecies interactions.


image: Appendix Not Totally Useless

Appendix Not Totally Useless

By | February 15, 2013

The small organ evolved too many times for it to be an accident, but it’s still unclear what it does.


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