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image: The King of Turtles

The King of Turtles

By | May 1, 2013

American naturalist Louis Agassiz had a zeal for collecting that encouraged a nation to engage with nature.


image: Viruses on the Brain

Viruses on the Brain

By | May 1, 2013

Viral infections of the central nervous system may trigger cytokines that induce seizures.


image: Humans Under Pressure

Humans Under Pressure

By | April 25, 2013

Better health care in Gambian villages lead to flip-flopping selection pressures on height and weight.


image: Naturalist’s House for Sale

Naturalist’s House for Sale

By | April 22, 2013

One of the surviving UK homes of pioneering but long-overlooked evolutionary theorist Alfred Russel Wallace is on the market.

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image: Visual Consciousness Emerges

Visual Consciousness Emerges

By | April 22, 2013

A new study of brain activity patterns suggests that babies as young as 5 months old have the neural mechanisms to register that they’ve seen a face.  


image: Did Inbreeding Royals Evolve?

Did Inbreeding Royals Evolve?

By | April 22, 2013

A new study suggests that in the Spanish Habsburg royal family, natural selection may have diminished the most harmful effects of inbreeding.


image: Measuring Consciousness

Measuring Consciousness

By | April 17, 2013

Researchers are identifying distinctive brain activity patterns that can be used to monitor patients under anesthesia and assess consciousness in “vegetative” patients.


image: Bad Stats Plague Neuroscience

Bad Stats Plague Neuroscience

By | April 16, 2013

A new study blames the unreliable nature of some research in the field on underpowered statistical analyses.

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image: Beer Tastes Intoxicating

Beer Tastes Intoxicating

By | April 15, 2013

Just the flavor of beer is enough to boost dopamine in brain areas related to reward—especially in men with alcoholic relatives.


image: Plant DNA Largely Unchanged

Plant DNA Largely Unchanged

By | April 15, 2013

Today’s tulip trees carry similar mitochondrial DNA as those that grew in the time of the dinosaurs.


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