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Cellular Research
Cellular Research

The Scientist

» products, neuroscience and evolution

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image: Neuron Preservers

Neuron Preservers

By | January 1, 2013

Unlike epithelial cells, neurons respond to herpes infection through autophagy, rather than by releasing inflammatory factors.

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image: Philip Low: Sleep Analyzer

Philip Low: Sleep Analyzer

By | January 1, 2013

Founder, Chairman, and CEO, NeuroVigil, Age: 33

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image: Sex and the Primordial Ooze

Sex and the Primordial Ooze

By | January 1, 2013

The rise of copulation as a vertebrate reproductive strategy may have driven crucial evolutionary change and explosive species radiation.

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image: Steal My Sunshine

Steal My Sunshine

By | January 1, 2013

How photosynthetic organisms get taken up, passed around, and discarded throughout the eukaryotic domain

6 Comments

image: Evolution by Splicing

Evolution by Splicing

By | December 20, 2012

Comparing gene transcripts from different species reveals surprising splicing diversity.

1 Comment

image: Science and Politics in 2012

Science and Politics in 2012

By | December 19, 2012

This year, US politics was dominated by the run-up to October elections, with science policy issues playing a role here and elsewhere around the world.

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image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: Conserved Chromatin?

Conserved Chromatin?

By | December 10, 2012

Archaea packages DNA around histones in a similar way to eukaryotes, suggesting that fitting a large genome into a small space was not the original role of chromatin.

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image: Insulin's Role in Body and Brain

Insulin's Role in Body and Brain

By , and | December 6, 2012

Insulin, long recognized as a primary regulator of blood glucose, is now also understood to play key roles in neuroplasticity, neuromodulation, and neurotrophism.

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image: Why Older People Get Scammed

Why Older People Get Scammed

By | December 4, 2012

Elderly people are worse at spotting untrustworthy faces, possibly due to decreased activity in the brain region associated with such perceptions.

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