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image: Undertaker's Bane

Undertaker's Bane

By | October 1, 2015

Harvard Professor Marc Weisskopf discusses the potential link between formaldehyde and ALS.

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image: Whistle Stop

Whistle Stop

By | October 1, 2015

Visit the remote Turkish village where the musical language that residents use to communicate across valleys is elucidating how language is processed in the brain.

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image: Whistle While You Work Your Brain

Whistle While You Work Your Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Communication based on whistles offers a “natural experiment” for studying how the brain processes language.

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image: Brain Gain

Brain Gain

By | October 1, 2015

Young neurons in the adult human brain are likely critical to its function.

2 Comments

image: Sex Differences in the Brain

Sex Differences in the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

How male and female brains diverge is a hotly debated topic, but the study of model organisms points to differences that cannot be ignored.

27 Comments

image: Endogenous Retrovirus Active in ALS

Endogenous Retrovirus Active in ALS

By | September 30, 2015

Researchers uncover evidence that a retrovirus embedded within the human genome may play a role in the pathology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

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image: CRISPR 2.0?

CRISPR 2.0?

By | September 28, 2015

A pioneer of the gene-editing technique discovers a protein that could improve its accuracy.

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image: Local Microbes Give Wine Character

Local Microbes Give Wine Character

By | September 24, 2015

Yeast strains from different regions of New Zealand generate wines with varying chemistries.

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image: Venter Enters the Consumer Genomics Biz

Venter Enters the Consumer Genomics Biz

By | September 22, 2015

The genomic entrepreneur has struck a deal with a South African health insurer to sequence the exomes of its customers.

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image: Alleged Scoop Sours Magnetoreceptor Collaboration

Alleged Scoop Sours Magnetoreceptor Collaboration

By | September 21, 2015

University administrators request a retraction upon learning that one researcher scooped another’s results despite having agreed not to.

1 Comment

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