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The Scientist

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image: The Root of the Problem

The Root of the Problem

By | August 1, 2011

New research suggests that the flow of carbon through plants to underground ecosystems may be crucial to how the environment responds to climate change.

18 Comments

image: Faculty Fallout

Faculty Fallout

By | August 1, 2011

Administrators have taken over US universities, and they’re steering institutions of higher learning away from the goal of serving as beacons of knowledge.

100 Comments

image: Seeing the Forest for the Trees

Seeing the Forest for the Trees

By | August 1, 2011

Getting the big picture means asking lots of little questions.

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image: An Unlichenly Pair

An Unlichenly Pair

By | August 1, 2011

A young botanist pays tribute to his mentor by naming a newly discovered, rare species in his honor.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | August 1, 2011

First Life, Radioactivity, Brain Bugs, Life of Earth

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Contributors

August 1, 2011

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2011 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Powering Clinical Trials

Powering Clinical Trials

By | August 1, 2011

To ensure high-quality clinical trials of a malaria vaccine, organizers in rural Africa must first upgrade electrical and research infrastructures.

9 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | August 1, 2011

August 2011's selection of notable quotes

12 Comments

image: Gene Patents Upheld

Gene Patents Upheld

By | July 29, 2011

A US federal appeals court says human genes are patentable.

6 Comments

Fisheries scientist ordered to refuse interviews about research on salmon decline.

0 Comments

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