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Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Life Science Reagents and Kits: Usage and Trends

Life Science Reagents and Kits: Usage and Trends

By | October 1, 2014

A survey of The Scientist readers identifies product trends and developments in life science reagents and kits.

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image: 2014 Top 10 Innovations: Last Chance to Submit

2014 Top 10 Innovations: Last Chance to Submit

By | September 15, 2014

The Scientist’s annual search for the best and brightest life science innovations is drawing to a close. Submit your new product or methodology today for a chance to win!

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

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image: Microplate Technology Usage and Trends

Microplate Technology Usage and Trends

By | August 29, 2014

A survey of The Scientist's readers identifies product trends and developments in microplate technology.

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image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Pipette Usage and Trends

Pipette Usage and Trends

By | July 31, 2014

A survey of The Scientist's readers to identify product trends and developments in pipette usage

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

1 Comment

image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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