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image: Should Human Genes be Patented?

Should Human Genes be Patented?

By | December 3, 2012

The Supreme Court agrees to hear a case deciding if two cancer genes should continue to be protected by patent.

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image: Stem Cells from Blood

Stem Cells from Blood

By | December 3, 2012

Researchers develop a practical technique for deriving stem cells from routine blood samples.  

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image: An Epi Phenomenon

An Epi Phenomenon

By | December 1, 2012

While exploring the genetics of a rare type of tumor, Stephen Baylin discovered an epigenetic modification that occurs in most every cancer—a finding he’s helping bring to the clinic.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Genomics 101

Genomics 101

By | December 1, 2012

Undergraduate students delve into genomics and synthetic biology thanks to a new breed of technologically advanced courses.

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image: In the Long Run

In the Long Run

By | December 1, 2012

Can emulating our early human ancestors make us healthier?

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image: Inside Genomics Education

Inside Genomics Education

By | December 1, 2012

Undergraduates and others are delving into modern genetics and genomics technologies in classrooms across the country.

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image: The Plastic Genome

The Plastic Genome

By | December 1, 2012

The poxvirus stockpiles genes when it needs to adapt.

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image: Waking Cancer Cells

Waking Cancer Cells

By | December 1, 2012

A protein called Coco rouses dormant breast cancer cells in the lung.

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image: Top 10 Innovations 2012

Top 10 Innovations 2012

By | December 1, 2012

The Scientist’s 5th installment of its annual competition attracted submissions from across the life science spectrum. Here are the best and brightest products of the year.

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