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The Scientist

» products, ecology and developmental biology

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image: Splitting Hairs

Splitting Hairs

By | September 1, 2014

Fragments of mitochondrial DNA from deer hair found on the clothing of an ice-entombed mummy offer a glimpse into Copper Age ecology.

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image: Beyond the Blueprint

Beyond the Blueprint

By , and | September 1, 2014

In addition to serving as a set of instructions to build an individual, the genome can influence neighboring organisms and, potentially, entire ecosystems.

9 Comments

image: Microplate Technology Usage and Trends

Microplate Technology Usage and Trends

By | August 29, 2014

A survey of The Scientist's readers identifies product trends and developments in microplate technology.

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image: Subglacial Ecosystem

Subglacial Ecosystem

By | August 22, 2014

Samples from an Antarctic lake 800 meters below the ice reveal an abundance of microbial life.

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image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Meal Plans

Meal Plans

By | August 1, 2014

Bacterial populations’ differing strategies for responding to their environment can set genetic routes to speciation.

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image: Pipette Usage and Trends

Pipette Usage and Trends

By | July 31, 2014

A survey of The Scientist's readers to identify product trends and developments in pipette usage

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image: Super Sniffers?

Super Sniffers?

By | July 24, 2014

African elephants have more genes for olfactory receptors than dogs or humans, a study shows. 

1 Comment

image: Dustup Over Lionfish Science Fair Project

Dustup Over Lionfish Science Fair Project

By | July 23, 2014

A former graduate student says he feels slighted by a failure to attribute his contributions to a line of research regarding the salinity tolerances of an invasive species.

15 Comments

image: Insecticides Harm Birds Indirectly

Insecticides Harm Birds Indirectly

By | July 10, 2014

The effects of neonicotinoid use on insect populations appear to be rippling through the food chain, scientists show.

1 Comment

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