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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

From therapeutics to gene transfer, bacteriophages offer a sustainable and powerful method of controlling microbes.

6 Comments

image: Unexpected Origin of an Avian Virus

Unexpected Origin of an Avian Virus

By | August 27, 2013

The transmission of reticuloendotheliosis viruses from mammals to birds was most likely an unexpected consequence of medical research.

0 Comments

image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

0 Comments

image: Ancient Mammalian Fossil Found

Ancient Mammalian Fossil Found

By | August 16, 2013

The chipmunk-sized Rugosodon eurasiaticus is the oldest representative of a prolific and long-lasting mammalian lineage.

0 Comments

image: Why One Cream Cake Leads to Another

Why One Cream Cake Leads to Another

By | August 15, 2013

Continuously eating fatty foods perturbs communication between the gut and brain, which in turn perpetuates a bad diet.

8 Comments

image: Psychedelic Phylogenetics

Psychedelic Phylogenetics

By | August 9, 2013

Using molecular markers, researchers reconstruct the “magic” mushroom family tree. 

0 Comments

image: Cancer-Causing Herbal Remedies

Cancer-Causing Herbal Remedies

By | August 7, 2013

A potent carcinogen lurks within certain traditional Chinese medicines.

15 Comments

image: Fossils Snarl Mammalian Roots

Fossils Snarl Mammalian Roots

By | August 7, 2013

Two newly discovered Jurassic-era fossils suggest drastically different mammalian origins.

2 Comments

image: Male Lineage Not Younger Than Females

Male Lineage Not Younger Than Females

By | August 2, 2013

Two genomic studies place the divergence of men from their most recent common ancestor nearer in time to that of women, though the field is far from a consensus.

1 Comment

image: STW: In the Field

STW: In the Field

By | August 1, 2013

Scientist to Watch Josh Snodgrass has traveled the world, from Siberia to South America, to study how the physiology of indigenous peoples shifts with changing lifestyles.

0 Comments

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