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image: GM Calves Move to University

GM Calves Move to University

By | December 21, 2015

The first two bulls genetically engineered to lack horns arrived at the University of California, Davis, for breeding.

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image: Domestication’s Downsides for Dogs

Domestication’s Downsides for Dogs

By | December 21, 2015

The selection of traits suitable for human companionship may have dragged along some unfavorable alleles.

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image: Gut Bugs Affect Cockroach Poop-ularity

Gut Bugs Affect Cockroach Poop-ularity

By | December 9, 2015

Commensal bacteria living in the gastrointestinal tracts of cockroaches lace the insects’ feces with chemical cues that mediate social behavior, according to a study.

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image: Metformin Users Have Different Gut Bugs

Metformin Users Have Different Gut Bugs

By | December 6, 2015

The popular type 2 diabetes drug may cause profound changes in patients’ microbiomes.

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image: Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

By | November 24, 2015

One large provider says the shortfall should clear up by early 2016.

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image: Blood-Gut Barrier

Blood-Gut Barrier

By | November 12, 2015

Scientists identify a barrier in mice between the intestine and its blood supply, and suggest how Salmonella sneaks through it.

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image: Exploring the Inner Universe

Exploring the Inner Universe

By | November 6, 2015

A new American Museum of Natural History exhibit introduces visitors to the microbes within their bodies. 

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2015

The Psychology of Overeating, The Hidden Half of Nature, The Death of Cancer, and The Secret of Our Success

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image: Microbesity

Microbesity

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity appears linked to the gut microbiome. How and why is still a mystery—but scientists have plenty of ideas.

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image: Microbiome Meals

Microbiome Meals

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers identify a handful of genes that help bacteria in the mouse gut adapt to dietary changes.

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