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» whole genome sequencing and neuroscience

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image: Decoding Dreams

Decoding Dreams

By | January 1, 2013

Researchers learn to predict visual imagery in dreams based on functional MRI scans of brain activity during sleep.

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image: Fast Worms

Fast Worms

By | January 1, 2013

A microfluidic device scans individual C. elegans for abnormal traits and sorts wild-type animals from mutants.

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image: Neuron Preservers

Neuron Preservers

By | January 1, 2013

Unlike epithelial cells, neurons respond to herpes infection through autophagy, rather than by releasing inflammatory factors.

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image: Philip Low: Sleep Analyzer

Philip Low: Sleep Analyzer

By | January 1, 2013

Founder, Chairman, and CEO, NeuroVigil, Age: 33

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image: Real-time Outbreak Sequencing

Real-time Outbreak Sequencing

By | December 19, 2012

Sequencing the whole genomes of bacterial pathogens as they spread among hospital patients and health care workers could transform the control of infectious disease.

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image: Year of the Fetus

Year of the Fetus

By | December 18, 2012

2012 saw the birth of a handful of non-invasive genetic prenatal tests, but the young industry faces growing pains as legal and ethical questions loom. 

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image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: 100,000 British Genomes

100,000 British Genomes

By | December 10, 2012

A new initiative lead by the UK’s National Health Service aims to sequence the genomes of as many as 100,000 patients, a project that will cost £100 million.

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image: Insulin's Role in Body and Brain

Insulin's Role in Body and Brain

By , , and | December 6, 2012

Insulin, long recognized as a primary regulator of blood glucose, is now also understood to play key roles in neuroplasticity, neuromodulation, and neurotrophism.

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image: Why Older People Get Scammed

Why Older People Get Scammed

By | December 4, 2012

Elderly people are worse at spotting untrustworthy faces, possibly due to decreased activity in the brain region associated with such perceptions.

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