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image: The Consequences of Sequencing Healthy People

The Consequences of Sequencing Healthy People

By | June 26, 2017

The first randomized trial to examine whole-genome sequencing in healthy people uncovers disease-causing genetic variants, but the overall benefits to this population are ambiguous.

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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

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image: Tracing Zika’s Spread Through Genetics

Tracing Zika’s Spread Through Genetics

By | May 25, 2017

DNA sequencing reveals that the virus responsible for the recent outbreak in the Americas originated in Brazil in 2014 and circulated undetected for months before the first cases were reported.

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image: Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?

Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?

By | May 15, 2017

Men have traditionally stolen the spotlight as scientific popularizers on TV, but women are making names for themselves in other formats.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Flavor</em>

Book Excerpt from Flavor

By | May 1, 2017

Author Bob Holmes dove into the taste-determining realm of his genome.

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image: Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

By | May 1, 2017

One person’s quest to get to the bottom of the unique way he experiences food

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | May 1, 2017

Climate change, research funding, race, and much more

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image: Mutations Linked to Secondary Cancers

Mutations Linked to Secondary Cancers

By | April 4, 2017

Childhood cancer survivors with mutations in certain cancer-risk genes have a higher risk of developing additional neoplasms later in life, according to research presented at the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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