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» whole genome sequencing and ecology

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Old Ocean Mold

By | December 12, 2012

Fungi in 100 million year-old seafloor sediments could possess novel antibiotics.

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100,000 British Genomes

By | December 10, 2012

A new initiative lead by the UK’s National Health Service aims to sequence the genomes of as many as 100,000 patients, a project that will cost £100 million.

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Marlboro Chicks

By | December 5, 2012

Two species of songbirds pack their nests with scavenged cigarette butts that repel irksome parasites.

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Contributors

By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Opinion: Learning from Transcriptomes

Opinion: Learning from Transcriptomes

By | November 28, 2012

In the largest microbial eukaryote genetic sequencing effort ever attempted, researchers are investigating the transcriptomes of 700 marine algae species.

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image: Coughing Seashells

Coughing Seashells

By | November 28, 2012

A type of scallop expels water and waste through a sort of cough that could reveal clues about water quality.

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image: Beetles Warm BC Forests

Beetles Warm BC Forests

By | November 27, 2012

Using satellite data, researchers calculate that mountain pine beetle infestations raise summertime temperatures in British Columbia’s pine forests by 1 degree Celsius.

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image: Old New Species

Old New Species

By | November 20, 2012

Decades can pass between the discovery of a new animal or plant and its official debut in the scientific literature.

4 Comments

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No Sex Required

By | November 19, 2012

An all-female species, distantly related to flatworms, steals all of genetic material it needs to diversify its genome.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Talking Genomics

Opinion: Talking Genomics

By | November 13, 2012

The crucial importance of language in the debate over the regulation of direct-to-consumer genetic tests

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