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» whole genome sequencing and ecology

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image: Real-time Outbreak Sequencing

Real-time Outbreak Sequencing

By | December 19, 2012

Sequencing the whole genomes of bacterial pathogens as they spread among hospital patients and health care workers could transform the control of infectious disease.

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image: Year of the Fetus

Year of the Fetus

By | December 18, 2012

2012 saw the birth of a handful of non-invasive genetic prenatal tests, but the young industry faces growing pains as legal and ethical questions loom. 

2 Comments

image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

1 Comment

image: Old Ocean Mold

Old Ocean Mold

By | December 12, 2012

Fungi in 100 million year-old seafloor sediments could possess novel antibiotics.

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image: 100,000 British Genomes

100,000 British Genomes

By | December 10, 2012

A new initiative lead by the UK’s National Health Service aims to sequence the genomes of as many as 100,000 patients, a project that will cost £100 million.

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Marlboro Chicks

By | December 5, 2012

Two species of songbirds pack their nests with scavenged cigarette butts that repel irksome parasites.

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Contributors

By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Opinion: Learning from Transcriptomes

Opinion: Learning from Transcriptomes

By | November 28, 2012

In the largest microbial eukaryote genetic sequencing effort ever attempted, researchers are investigating the transcriptomes of 700 marine algae species.

1 Comment

image: Coughing Seashells

Coughing Seashells

By | November 28, 2012

A type of scallop expels water and waste through a sort of cough that could reveal clues about water quality.

1 Comment

image: Beetles Warm BC Forests

Beetles Warm BC Forests

By | November 27, 2012

Using satellite data, researchers calculate that mountain pine beetle infestations raise summertime temperatures in British Columbia’s pine forests by 1 degree Celsius.

3 Comments

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