The Scientist

» whole genome sequencing

Most Recent

image: Royal Treatment

Royal Treatment

By | February 12, 2014

Scientists in the U.K. will sequence the genome of King Richard III.

0 Comments

image: Dog-Wolf Split

Dog-Wolf Split

By | January 17, 2014

Yet another genetic study of modern canines, both wild and domestic, supports the notion that humans domesticated dogs before growing crops.

0 Comments

image: $1,000 Genome at Last?

$1,000 Genome at Last?

By | January 15, 2014

Illumina says its newest sequencing system can churn out whole human genomes for $1,000 apiece.

3 Comments

image: A New Basal Animal

A New Basal Animal

By | December 12, 2013

Comb jellies take their place on the oldest branch of the animal family tree.  

4 Comments

image: Scientists Confirm Bats Carry SARS

Scientists Confirm Bats Carry SARS

By | October 31, 2013

Whole-genome sequences for two novel coronaviruses from Chinese horseshoe bats are the most closely related to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus to date.

0 Comments

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | September 9, 2013

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes  

0 Comments

image: Sequenced at Birth

Sequenced at Birth

By | September 5, 2013

An NIH program will study the promises and pitfalls of sequencing newborns’ genomes.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Restoring Tomato Flavor

Opinion: Restoring Tomato Flavor

By | August 28, 2013

Commercial tomatoes rarely have that fresh vine-ripened flavor that everyone loves, but the ideal recipe for tomato taste is now known. Will growers embrace the new cultivars?

4 Comments

image: Price Drop for Sequencing Slows

Price Drop for Sequencing Slows

By | May 16, 2013

The cost of DNA sequencing has gotten more expensive for the first time since records have been kept.

0 Comments

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | May 7, 2013

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Immune Cells Deliver Cancer Drugs to the Brain
AAAS