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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | May 7, 2013

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: What Should Patients Be Told About Genetic Risk?

What Should Patients Be Told About Genetic Risk?

By | May 7, 2013

Experts disagree on how doctors should reveal incidental findings in patients’ DNA sequences.

1 Comment

image: Sequencing Cancer

Sequencing Cancer

By | April 9, 2013

This month’s AACR attendees, including National Cancer Institute Director Harold Varmus, discuss new approaches to cancer research using whole genome sequencing.

1 Comment

image: Privacy and the HeLa Genome

Privacy and the HeLa Genome

By | March 26, 2013

European scientists have taken down the HeLa genome after publishing it without the consent of Henrietta Lacks’s family.

6 Comments

image: Revealing Genetic Risks

Revealing Genetic Risks

By | March 22, 2013

Genetics experts argue that patients should be told about dangerous variants in their DNA that show up incidentally during sequencing.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Genomics in the Clinic

Opinion: Genomics in the Clinic

By | March 18, 2013

Next-generation sequencing diagnostics are already being used, and patients are ready.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | March 6, 2013

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

0 Comments

image: New DNA-based Prenatal Test

New DNA-based Prenatal Test

By | March 1, 2013

Another company has launched a non-invasive DNA screen for genetic disorders in unborn babies, adding to the competition in an emerging market.

3 Comments

image: Bigfoot DNA is Bunk

Bigfoot DNA is Bunk

By | February 15, 2013

The group that last year claimed to have sequenced the Sasquatch genome has finally published its data in a brand new “journal,” and geneticists are not impressed.  

7 Comments

image: Anonymity Under Threat

Anonymity Under Threat

By | January 17, 2013

Scientists uncover the identities of anonymous DNA donors using freely available web searches.

4 Comments

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