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image: Nanobombs Terminate Foodborne Microbes

Nanobombs Terminate Foodborne Microbes

By | March 5, 2015

Researchers engineer water nanostructures to wipe out pathogens that can spoil food and pose health risks.

2 Comments

image: Tough-to-Clean Equipment a Bigger Problem

Tough-to-Clean Equipment a Bigger Problem

By | March 2, 2015

The number of deaths attributable to certain medical probes may go beyond a recent outbreak in Los Angeles.

2 Comments

image: A Deathly Pallor

A Deathly Pallor

By | March 1, 2015

Global warming could lead to lighter-colored insects with waning immune defenses.

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image: Of Cells and Limits

Of Cells and Limits

By | March 1, 2015

Leonard Hayflick has been unafraid to speak his mind, whether it is to upend a well-entrenched dogma or to challenge the federal government. At 86, he’s nowhere near retirement.

3 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2015

March 2015's selection of notable quotes

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image: Climate Change Denier on Fossil Fuel Payroll

Climate Change Denier on Fossil Fuel Payroll

By | February 23, 2015

A leading scientific voice among global warming skeptics received funding from the energy industry while publishing claims that climate change is not driven by human activity.

1 Comment

image: Medical Equipment May Spread Superbug

Medical Equipment May Spread Superbug

By | February 20, 2015

Drug-resistant bacteria have spread in a Los Angeles hospital, perhaps from contaminated endoscopes.

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image: Subway Microbiome

Subway Microbiome

By | February 9, 2015

Researchers document the bacterial life living among New York City’s transit stations.

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image: Stubbornly Persistent

Stubbornly Persistent

By | February 1, 2015

Microorganisms continually challenge our assumptions of what life can achieve.

1 Comment

image: The Energy of Life

The Energy of Life

By | February 1, 2015

Extremophiles should not be viewed through an anthropocentric lens; what’s extreme for us may be a perfectly comfortable environment for a microbe.

3 Comments

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