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image: Human Gut Microbe Transplant Alters Mouse Behavior

Human Gut Microbe Transplant Alters Mouse Behavior

By | March 1, 2017

Fecal transplants from humans with irritable bowel syndrome and anxiety into mice lead to similar symptoms and anxiety-like behavior in the rodents, researchers report.  

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image: Image of the Day: Penguin Run

Image of the Day: Penguin Run

By | March 1, 2017

Little penguins (Eudyptula minor) live on the southeast coast of Australia, one of the global “hot spots” of marine diversity most severely affected by global warming.

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NASA researchers have discovered ancient microbes locked inside minerals, suggesting a possible niche for interstellar life.

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An analysis of 130 studies reveals that the threat of global warming to wildlife has been underreported. 

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image: Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

By | February 8, 2017

Researchers employ an engineered microbe to destroy tumor cells in mice.

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The Princeton physicist told The Scientist that then-President–elect Donald Trump last month agreed with his position that climate change research has become a “cult movement.” Happer also shared his thoughts on federal research funding, demonstrators marching for science, and more.

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Researchers solve the mystery of 15-year-old mutant ferns with disrupted sex determination.

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image: Discovering Novel Antibiotics

Discovering Novel Antibiotics

By | February 1, 2017

Three methods identify and activate silent bacterial gene clusters to uncover new drugs

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image: Scientists Respond to CDC Climate Summit Cancellation

Scientists Respond to CDC Climate Summit Cancellation

By | January 25, 2017

An agency-sponsored meeting, which is now postponed indefinitely, was intended to highlight the ways in which global warming poses threats to public health.

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Study of 81 six-week-olds who were born by C-section or vaginal delivery didn’t show differences in the structure or function of their microbiota, despite contrary results from other studies on babies. 

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