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image: Neurons Compete to Form Memories

Neurons Compete to Form Memories

By | July 21, 2016

The same populations of brain cells encode memories that occur close together in time, according to new research.

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image: How Type 2 Diabetes Affects the Brain

How Type 2 Diabetes Affects the Brain

By | July 21, 2016

The results of studies on humans and zebrafish suggest how hyperglycemia can cause cognitive deficits.

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image: Mapping the Human Connectome

Mapping the Human Connectome

By | July 20, 2016

A new map of human cortex combines data from multiple imaging modalities and comprises 180 distinct regions.

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More than half of the world’s land may have passed the threshold that threatens long-term sustainable development, researchers report.

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A 3-D carbon nanotube mesh enables rat spinal tissue sections to reconnect in culture.

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image: Allen Institute Launches Brain Observatory

Allen Institute Launches Brain Observatory

By | July 13, 2016

The first data include real-time neural activity in the visual cortex of mice observing pictures and videos.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Oysters At Risk

Oysters At Risk

By | July 1, 2016

Climate change is causing ocean acidification, and shellfish, such as oysters, are bearing the brunt of the shift.

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image: Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

By | July 1, 2016

The University of St. Andrews behavioral ecologist studies the social structures and behaviors of whales and dolphins, recording and analyzing their acoustic communications.

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image: Submerged Pigs Inform Forensics

Submerged Pigs Inform Forensics

By | July 1, 2016

Watching the decomposition of pig carcasses anchored to the seafloor is helping forensic researchers understand what to expect of human remains dumped in the ocean.

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