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The Stanford University psychiatrist and neuroscientist known for his contributions to optogenetics and tissue clearing is awarded €4 million by the Fresenius Research Prize.

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image: Warming to Blame for Coral Bleaching in Hawaii

Warming to Blame for Coral Bleaching in Hawaii

By | May 30, 2017

Nearly half of the corals in a nature preserve off Oahu bleached in recent years, according to a study.

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image: Binge-Eating Neurons Identified

Binge-Eating Neurons Identified

By | May 26, 2017

Inducing activity in the zona incerta region of the brain prompts mice to gorge themselves.

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image: Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

By | May 26, 2017

Two previously overlooked archaeal strains fill an evolutionary gap for microbes.

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image: Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself

Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself

By | May 24, 2017

A fish created by spontaneous androgenesis is the first known vertebrate to arise naturally by this asexual reproductive phenomenon. 

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image: Smarty Genes

Smarty Genes

By | May 23, 2017

Scientists have identified 40 new genes linked to human intelligence.

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image: Antarctica Is Turning Green

Antarctica Is Turning Green

By | May 22, 2017

As the climate warms, moss growth dramatically spreads on the continent’s peninsula. 

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Harvesting lab-raised zebrafish based on their size led to differences in the activity of more than 4,000 genes, as well as changes in allele frequencies of those genes, in the fish that remained.

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image: A Coral to Outlast Climate Change

A Coral to Outlast Climate Change

By | May 18, 2017

Stylophora pistillata, a reef coral in the Northern Red Sea, thrived in simulated global-warming conditions.

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image: Image of the Day: Missing Pieces

Image of the Day: Missing Pieces

By | May 12, 2017

Researchers made a 3-D reconstruction of one of neurobiology's most famous brains—that of Henry Gustav Molaison (HM).

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