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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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The presence of similar light-emitting enzymes in the distantly related organisms lends new insight into bioluminescence evolution.

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image: Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding Got an Early Start

Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding Got an Early Start

By | July 5, 2017

Mitochondrial DNA in Neanderthal bone suggests humans first left Africa earlier than previously thought.

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Students will not learn the theory in primary and secondary schools nationwide. 

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image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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Rather than offering grant funds to US researchers, some French researchers wish Macron would commit to funding domestic labs. 

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The new fossils push the origin of the human species back by 100,000 years.

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image: Mammals May Have a 12-Hour Clock

Mammals May Have a 12-Hour Clock

By | June 6, 2017

Data point to peaks in gene expression in the morning and evening that are distinct from day-night circadian cycles.

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The UC Davis agroecologist grew up on a farm and now works to help farmers grow more resilient crops.

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