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image: Study: Last Woolly Mammoths Died of Thirst

Study: Last Woolly Mammoths Died of Thirst

By | August 3, 2016

On remote island near Alaska, salt water intrusion and a warming climate killed off the last remaining survivors of the species.

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image: How Your Nose Got Its Shape

How Your Nose Got Its Shape

By | August 1, 2016

Climate variation has sculpted our schnozzes since the earliest humans evolved, but environmental pressures can’t explain everything.

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image: Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

By | August 1, 2016

In mice, immune cells from the body cavity surrounding organs arrive at the site of damage to chew up the nuclei of dead cells.

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image: Nailing Down HAR Function

Nailing Down HAR Function

By | August 1, 2016

A remaining challenge in the study of human accelerated regions (HARs) is establishing their specific functions during development and other biological processes.

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image: Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

By | August 1, 2016

Immune cells called macrophages from the peritoneal cavity of mice migrate to injured livers and aid in repair.

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image: On Becoming Human

On Becoming Human

By | August 1, 2016

Some thoughts on going to the Galápagos

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image: Opinion: Monogamy and Cooperation Are Connected Through Multiple Links

Opinion: Monogamy and Cooperation Are Connected Through Multiple Links

By and | August 1, 2016

Why does cooperation evolve most often in monogamous animals?

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image: Opinion: Our Inner Caveman

Opinion: Our Inner Caveman

By | August 1, 2016

The modern human brain evolved in social and environmental settings very unlike today’s. Despite our cultural and technological progress, tribal instincts remain.

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A chloroplast mutation has dramatically affected the genomes of railside populations of Arabidopsis thaliana.

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image: Understanding Human Accelerated Regions

Understanding Human Accelerated Regions

By | August 1, 2016

Fast-evolving regions of the human genome differentiate our species from all other mammals.

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