Advertisement
NuAire
NuAire

The Scientist

» climate change and immunology

Most Recent

image: Normal Fat Tissue Metabolism

Normal Fat Tissue Metabolism

By | December 6, 2012

Adipose tissue plays an immune role in individuals of normal wieght.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Evolving CO2-Hungry Crops

Opinion: Evolving CO2-Hungry Crops

By and | December 4, 2012

Breeding plants that can convert more carbon dioxide to food could help feed a growing population.

1 Comment

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Fat's Immune Sentinels

Fat's Immune Sentinels

By | December 1, 2012

Certain immune cells keep adipose tissue in check by helping to define normal and abnormal physiological states.

0 Comments

image: In the Long Run

In the Long Run

By | December 1, 2012

Can emulating our early human ancestors make us healthier?

1 Comment

image: The Legacy of Kyoto

The Legacy of Kyoto

By | November 29, 2012

The Kyoto agreement to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions was flawed, but it provides useful lessons for upcoming climate regulation negotiations.

0 Comments

image: Can Worms Alleviate Autism?

Can Worms Alleviate Autism?

By | November 27, 2012

Autism researchers are testing the ability of whipworm eggs to treat autism in a new clinical trial.

10 Comments

image: Beetles Warm BC Forests

Beetles Warm BC Forests

By | November 27, 2012

Using satellite data, researchers calculate that mountain pine beetle infestations raise summertime temperatures in British Columbia’s pine forests by 1 degree Celsius.

3 Comments

image: Record High for Greenhouse Gases

Record High for Greenhouse Gases

By | November 21, 2012

The World Meteorological Organization finds that the atmospheric gases behind climate change reached a new record high in 2011.

1 Comment

image: Tracking Sewage Spilled by Sandy

Tracking Sewage Spilled by Sandy

By | November 15, 2012

Researchers at the University of Delaware use satellites to predict the course of raw sewage through the western Atlantic.

0 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Making Progress by Slowing Down
  2. How Fats Influence the Microbiome
  3. Censored Professor Quits
    The Nutshell Censored Professor Quits

    Alice Dreger is resigning from the faculty of Northwestern University, claiming that the administration censored her work in a faculty journal.

  4. Influential Cancer Biologist Dies
Advertisement
Advertisement
Life Technologies