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Researchers solve the mystery of 15-year-old mutant ferns with disrupted sex determination.

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image: Unique Antibodies Open Path Toward New HIV Vaccines

Unique Antibodies Open Path Toward New HIV Vaccines

By | January 27, 2017

A family of broadly neutralizing antibodies from a chronically infected donor provides a schematic for designing vaccines and treatments that target multiple strains of the virus.

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image: Scientists Respond to CDC Climate Summit Cancellation

Scientists Respond to CDC Climate Summit Cancellation

By | January 25, 2017

An agency-sponsored meeting, which is now postponed indefinitely, was intended to highlight the ways in which global warming poses threats to public health.

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image: Speaking of Science: 2016

Speaking of Science: 2016

By | December 19, 2016

Selected quotes from an eventful year

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image: Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

By | December 16, 2016

A finding of misconduct spurs the retraction of a Science paper claiming to have identified a protein in mice that boosted immunity to both viruses and cancer.

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The President-elect has not indicated that his administration will delete existing data, but concerned scientists are not taking any chances.

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image: Oklahoma Attorney General Nominated to Lead EPA

Oklahoma Attorney General Nominated to Lead EPA

By | December 8, 2016

Scott Pruitt, who does not believe in man-made climate change, has sued the Environmental Protection Agency over policies aimed at reducing carbon emissions.

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image: Trumping Science: Part II

Trumping Science: Part II

By | December 6, 2016

As Inauguration Day nears, scientists and science advocates are voicing their unease with the Trump Administration’s potential effects on research.

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image: Naive T Cells Find Homes in Lymphoid Tissue

Naive T Cells Find Homes in Lymphoid Tissue

By | December 2, 2016

The human lymph nodes and spleen maintain unique, compartmentalized sets of naive T cells well into old age.

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image: Low Social Status May Weaken Immune System in Monkeys

Low Social Status May Weaken Immune System in Monkeys

By | November 29, 2016

Life at the bottom of the pecking order ramps up inflammation, according to new research, an effect that appears to be reversible.

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